Kaleköy

The last Stop before we reach Fineke Marina, our Sharki’s new home in Turkey, is Kaleköy – which means Castle’s Village in Turkish. The ruins of an impressive Byzantine castle rest high above this delightful hamlet, which is built on and among the ruins of Ancient Simena.

Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast

Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast

Castle in Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast

Castle in Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast

Carob Cidre cooking for 24 hours over open fire in Kale Köy

Carob Cidre cooking for 24 hours over open fire in Kale Köy

Carob Tree in Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast of Turkey

Carob Tree in Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast of Turkey

Sharki anchored in Kerkova Roads, Turkey

Sharki anchored in Kerkova Roads, Turkey

View from Castle in Kale Köy, Turkey

View from Castle in Kale Köy, Turkey

From the Castle you can see over to the now uninhabited island of Kekova, which used to be called Dolchiste in Antiquity. The town was destroyed by an earthquake in the 2nd century CE, but was rebuilt in Byzantine time. It was finally abandoned by it’s inhabitants when  Arabs attacked, leaving  behind carefully carved steps leading to the shore, smooth walls carved out of the stone and underwater foundations of long deserted buildings. The Kekova shoreline is declared a specially protected area where no swimming over the “underwater city” is allowed. We motored by, marvelling at the signs of human activity and decided to let the dinghy down to take a look underwater. While Bill and Opa kept our Sharki off the coast, I rowed closeby the shore so the kids could hang their heads in the water, looking at stone piles through their goggles.

 

View from Castle in Kale Köy, Turkey

View from Castle in Kale Köy, Turkey

More underwater stonework from ancient paths are visible in the shallow bay by Kaleköy itself. A lone sarcophagus tells of the unusual funerary architecture of Lycia, a people settling here and other places in Southwest Turkey 2500 years ago. Around the castle there are more of these massive sarcophagi scattered throughout the landscape in no apparent order. It seems like the whole hamlet of Kaleköy is nestled in a mysterious Lycian necropolis.

Sunken sarcophagus in Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast, Turkey

Sunken sarcophagus in Kale Köy on the Lycian Coast, Turkey

In Kaleköy time seems to have come to a halt. There are no cars, the hamlet can only be reached by foot (45 min) from the neighboring village or by boat. During the day many local tour boats arrive with visitors wanting to see Simena Castle with it’s superb views and the smallest amphitheater in the world (only 12 seats)! But in the evening it gets quiet and we are the only boat anchored.

Large carob trees green the hill and provide shade for people and goats. The fruit is used for carob cider which is supposedly very healthy. We didn’t get to try it, but saw it simmering in a brown liquid over an open wood fire which was kept going by an old lady. According to her it has to cook for at least 24 hours and is quite tasty. We will come back to try it and to spend some more time in this truly special and secluded place.

 

3 Comments

on “Kaleköy
3 Comments on “Kaleköy
  1. Hello Gabriela, Bill, Sol and Leoni,
    we are so grateful for your faithful and eager reporting of the fascinating “world” which you are exploring day by day. We learn so much and get a glimpse of what there is to see and experience when one goes on an adventure without limits, it seems.
    Thank you, thank you, and just keep writing. We do appreciate it very much to hear from you as you are so far away, and yet so near.
    Greetings from Ingrid

  2. What a loveable dog! You’ll never forget him!
    And I can see your Mom taking the picture in the window………
    Enjoy your holidays as much as you can. Soon it will be over and you can tell us
    all about the fascinating things you did and saw.
    Greetings from Ingrid

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